Worldviews, frames, and stories that make people want to buy

“Marketing succeeds when enough people with similar worldviews come together in a way that allows marketers to reach them cost-effectively.”  ~Seth Godin

When you know your audience well, what you’re really tuning in to is the way your people view the world. And when you understand the worldview your prospects share – the things they believe – you can frame your story in a way that resonates so strongly with them that you enjoy an “unfair” advantage over your competition.

Consider these competing worldviews, framed differently by simple word choice:

  • Fitness Enthusiast vs. Gym Rat
  • Progressive vs. Moonbat
  • Businessman vs. The Man

These are extreme examples, and you can cater to audience beliefs and worldviews without resorting to name-calling. For example, the simple word “green” can provoke visceral reactions at the far sides of the environmental worldview spectrum, while also prompting less-intense emotions in the vast middle.

Framing your story against a polar opposite, by definition, will make some love you and others ignore or even despise you. That’s not only okay, it’s necessary. You’ll likely never convert those at the other end of the spectrum, but your core base will share your content and help you penetrate the vast group in the middle – and that’s where growth comes from.

randomThe premise is the way you choose to tell the story so that you get the conclusion you desire. It’s the delivery of the framed message with dramatic tension and one or more relatable heroes so that your goals are achieved.

It’s important to understand the difference between the beliefs or worldview of your audience (the frame), and the expression of that belief or worldview back to them. Think about your favorite novel or film … the same information could have been transmitted another way, but just not as well. In fact, stories have been retold over and over throughout the ages – some are just better told than others.

The premise is essentially the difference between success and failure (or good and great) when it comes to copywriting and storytelling. As we’re about to see, copywriting and storytelling are essentially the same thing when it comes down to it.