FINDING THE INDIAN EMOJI

BOBBY PAWAR MANAGING DIRECTOR AND CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER, PUBLICIS SOUTH ASIA

The `Pinky’ emoji that shows a raised little finger is the countrywide signal for taking a break to take a leak…on the street, in a galli, outside a building, or behind a tree.It’s a gesture you learn in kindergarten that stays with you all your life. T he `nimbu-mirchi’ on a string has always been used to ward off the evil gaze. So if you want to show off your new car to your friends, you only have to add this emoji to the SMS to avoid `nazar’. In a message about how swimmingly things are going with your boss at the moment, you may want to add this for continued luck. T he third emoji, the auto rickshaw says it like it is.After all, this ubiquitous 3-wheeler and all that it stands for is unique to India.This emoji can also denote a bumpy ride or a narrow escape through the patli galli.

RAJIV RAO NATIONAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR, OGILVY & MATHER, INDIA

I n India this knot can only signify matrimony, just the way the West recognizes the wedding band and the veil. It could also be a cheeky reference to being bound for life. The ladoo emoji is a direct reference to “muhh meetha“.It could be the boondi laddu of the north or the rawa ladoo of the south but it invariably means celebration time. This is an emoji that says: “Congratulations!“emoji indian woman

KV SRIDHAR “POPS“ CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER, INDIA, SAPIENT NITRO

W e have tried to encapsulate India in two kinds of emojis.The first looks at behaviour, the second at culture. The spitting emoji is something that Indians from Kashmir to Kanyakumari can relate to; it is a `paan’ Indian phenomenon. From a Mercedes owner to a truck driver, the `thoo’ is the common denominator. The karva chauth emoji is representative of the sexist irony of our culture. It signifies a woman who is never given her due, but still continues to pray for her husband.

Finland recently released a string of national emojis to be used in digital communication. Sunday Times asked four Indian ad agencies to come up with icons that capture real India

PRASANNA SANKHE | FOUNDER & CREATIVE HEAD, HYPHEN

A s a culture, we Indians need to develop a sense of humour and so we should make good use of the plethora of characters and personalities in our own society. Musician Bappi Lahiri with his fondness for gold, glares and OTT attire, is one such. He captures India’s love for all things bling. T he Ghajini emoji recalls Bollywood, a fixture in our lives and our best-known export to the world. Here is the classic poster for the movie Ghajini, re-interpreted as an emoji. This can be used to flag a forgetful person, or to tell someone you forgot something. It could also be a fun way to show a perpetually angry person.

Source: TOI 15 Nov’2015