7 diet myths no one told you about

So, you hear that kale chips are the best thing that could have happened to your diet? Not quite. We bust some common diet myths for you.

The food industry has never bombarded you with so much information to decipher. One study says that eggs are good for you, another completely debunks the theory. How do you then keep up? Fret not. Here are facts behind seven new nutritional myths.

-Myth :

Kale is the real super green

-Fact :

Dieticians across the board wonder when did a palak eating nation take to kale and its varied versions -kale chips are considered the new good-for-you snacks.But before you go hunting to the super mart in search of the packets, see this: A 2014 study at William Paterson University ranked fruits and vegetables by their nutrient density, based on their levels of 17 different nutrients that have been linked to improved cardiovascular health.

Kale didn’t even make the top 10. Though Kale is packed with antioxidants and other nutrients, it is as healthy as any other green veggie. You won’t suffer a health hazard if you don’t consume it.

-Myth :

Eat fish to get omega-3 fats

-Fact :

The omega-3 family is credited with innumerable health benefits, ranging from promoting brain development in infants to improving heart health in adulthood.Marine-based supplements are the only way to fuel your body with EPA and DHA -two important omega-3 fatty acids. However, walnuts, flaxseed, canola oil, soybeans and some other plant foods offer ALA, a third omega-3 fatty acid.You need all three types of omega-3 fats for optimal health.

Studies prove without ALA, you’d have scaly skin and problems with hair growth and wound healing. Diets rich in ALA decrease the risk of fatal ischemic heart disease.But don’t depend entirely on it. For opti mal health, include both fish and plant-based omega-3 sources in your diet.diet myths

-Myth :

Brown bread is better than the white variety

-Fact :

So you reach out to the multi-grain bread at a bakery with a vengeance, thinking it is a better option than the packaged white bread. But the brown bread, like it or not, is the biggest hoax. Various ingredients from coffee to edible color are packed in to give the bread the healthy shade you desire.

The sugar content in the bread are the same as white and so is the maida content. Do your health a favor: always look for the words “100 per cent whole wheat” or buy it from a trusted neighborhood bakery.

-Myth :

Eat cake be happy

-Fact :

It is a misnomer that a plate of fried onion bhajiyas is going to banish the monsoon blues. You think that cake when you feel lonely will make you feel better? Well, no. The idea that we can feel better by simply consuming certain foods is appealing, but in reality, feeling better has nothing to do with the food.

It’s a weak psychological effect. The comfort foods we turn to the most are the ones we ate while growing up, or the ones that remind us of `happy occasions’.You are better off solving your core mental concerns than your waistline later.

-Myth :

Stay away from eggs

-Fact :

And that yolk, for sure. Heard this before? Large studies suggest that this theory is all wrong.The famous Framingham Heart Study, which first showed that high blood cholesterol causes heart attacks, found no connection between eating eggs and cardiovascular disease. It turns out that about 25 per cent of the cholesterol in your blood comes from food.

The other 75 per cent is manufactured by the liver, which produces lots of cholesterol when you eat cheeseburgers and other sources of saturated fat -something eggs are low in. Eggs are filled with useful nutrients that may offset any damage done by their cholesterol content, including unsaturated fat, folate and other B vitamins and minerals. So, next time don’t guilt yourself into eating a plate of scrambled eggs for breakfast.

-Myth :

Eating protein builds muscle

-Fact :

To build muscle, you must have three key components: adequate calories, a decent intake of protein and a good strength training programme.Without enough calories, some of the dietary protein will be used as an energy source. Likewise, protein intake beyond your needs will either be stored as fat or burnt for energy. The timing of your protein is important.

After resistance training, consuming a rich source of protein such as cheese, along with some carbohydrate has been shown to build muscle. To build muscle, you need to eat a healthy diet, which includes a normal amount of protein, and train regularly.

-Myth :

Nutrition bars are healthy

-Fact:

Most packaged nutrition bars are loaded with synthetic ingredients. These products contain artificial flavors, sweeteners and toxic chemicals you shouldn’t consume. Typically, low sugar bars contain either sucralose or sugar alcohols. Sucralose, originally invented as a pesticide, is just sugar bleached by the toxic chemical chlorine. Meanwhile, sugar alcohols, such as maltitol and erythritol, are made from GMO corn and can cause digestive problems and allergic reactions.